Health Vitamins & Nutrition Centre, Langley BC
Nutrition for a Healthy Pregnancy
  • June 11th, 2013
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  • Briony Martens B.Sc ROHP
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Prenatal Nutrition: It all comes down to you, Mom



After that first single cell comes alive, every ounce of your babys growing body comes from you, Mom. The vitamins and minerals you consume during pregnancy are your babys fuel and those nutrients are your babys primary building blocks for growth. So eat wisely!

Unique daily nourishment for you and your baby

You and your baby need daily nutrition that supports a healthy pregnancy and fetal development. Its no small challenge. Our diets alone may not support individual optimal nutrition, much less the unique nutritional needs associated with pregnancy. Thats why a daily prenatal multi-vitamin is common practice for most pregnant women. But not all prenatal vitamins are created equal. Look for one that offers whole-food complexed, organic nourishment vs. simple synthetic chemical isolates.

DHA and omega fatty acids

Finding a fish oil that is rich in omegas is a great way to support a healthy pregnancy. Fish oil contains an abundance of omega fatty acids, often referred to as "good fats". These serve to nourish brain, nerves, and eye tissues and have also been shown to benefit cardiovascular and joint health.

DHA, in particular, is important for fetal development of your babys brain and eyes during pregnancy. Emerging research suggests the whole complement of vital omegas found in a naturally pure fish oil may play an important role in delivering critical DHA to your growing baby.

Fatigue, stress & nausea
Fatigue and oxidative stress can be major issues for pregnant women. But there are certain foods that can help. Look for foods with high ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorption Capacity) ratings like blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, prunes and raisins. Nausea, indigestion and constipation are also constant issues, and many think theres not much they can do about it. But again, Nature provides certain foods and herbs that may help, like ginger and honey as well as fermented rosehips and oats.

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